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GM Invests $449 Million for Next Generation Electrification

April 10, 2014 in Electric Vehicles, EV News, GM, Volt

General Motors announced that it will invest $449 to upgrade manufacturing processes at Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly and Brownstown Battery Assembly plants in preparation for the next generation of electric vehicles and advanced battery technologies. The announcement was made Tuesday, April 8, 2014 by Gerald Johnson, GM North America Manufacturing vice-president. Infographic courtesy of GM

General Motors announced that it will invest $449 to upgrade manufacturing processes at Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly and Brownstown Battery Assembly plants in preparation for the next generation of electric vehicles and advanced battery technologies. The announcement was made Tuesday, April 8, 2014 by Gerald Johnson, GM North America Manufacturing vice-president.
Infographic courtesy of GM

DETROIT – In preparation for the next generation of electric vehicles and advanced battery technologies, General Motors will invest $449 million to upgrade manufacturing processes at Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly and Brownstown Battery Assembly plants.

“General Motors is committed to building award-winning products and developing technologies in America, which helps to grow our economy from a resurgent auto industry,” said Gerald Johnson, GM North America Manufacturing vice president. “These investments will help the next-generation Chevrolet Volt build on its position as the leader in electrified propulsion.”

The investment, announced at the Automotive Press Association, is the largest to date at both facilities and includes $384 million at Detroit-Hamtramck for new Body Shop tooling, equipment, and additional plant upgrades to build the next generation Chevrolet Volt and two future products. This brings GM’s total investment at Detroit-Hamtramck to more than $1 billion over the last five years.

GM’s $65 million investment at its Brownstown Battery Assembly will support the next generation of lithium-ion battery production and future battery systems.

“Michigan is poised for even greater global leadership in automotive innovation,” Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder said. “This significant investment by GM will harness the power of our state’s unparalleled assets, such as its talent, world-class universities, and research and development capabilities.

“While challenges remain throughout the auto industry, this announcement shows that it is looking to the future, and the resulting technological advancements will strengthen our economy and benefit our environment,” Snyder said. “This is great news for Detroit, the region and all of Michigan.”

Since 2009, GM has announced more than $5.4 billion in U.S. facility investment for vehicle technologies that benefit customers. This includes more than $2.8 billion invested in Michigan-based facilities alone.

The Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly Plant is the world’s only automotive plant that mass-produces extended-range electric vehicles – including the Volt, Cadillac ELR and Opel Ampera – for markets in 33 countries. Detroit-Hamtramck also builds the Chevrolet Malibu and Impala sedans and is home to a 264,000-square-foot photovoltaic solar array that can generate up to 516 kilowatts of electricity, or enough to charge 150 electric vehicles per day.

“This is a significant investment by General Motors and it helps to further position Detroit as a leader in the innovative technologies of tomorrow,” said Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan. “We anticipate that the upgrading of the Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly Plant and the production of GM’s next-generation electric vehicles will create well-paying jobs for Detroiters. As we continue to bring real change to our city, we need partners like GM who are committed to investing in our future.”

Brownstown Battery Assembly’s 479,000-square-foot, landfill-free facility south of Detroit produces the lithium-ion battery packs for GM’s extended-range electric vehicles. It started mass production in October 2010 and is the first high-volume manufacturing site in the U.S. operated by a major automaker for automotive lithium-ion battery production. The site was made possible with the help of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding through the U.S. Department of Energy.

General Motors Co. (NYSE:GM, TSX: GMM) and its partners produce vehicles in 30 countries, and the company has leadership positions in the world’s largest and fastest-growing automotive markets. GM, its subsidiaries and joint venture entities sell vehicles under the Chevrolet, Cadillac, Baojun, Buick, GMC, Holden, Jiefang, Opel, Vauxhall and Wuling brands. More information on the company and its subsidiaries, including OnStar, a global leader in vehicle safety, security and information services, can be found at http://www.gm.com.

This article is a repost, credit: GM. Video courtesy of GM.

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Researchers produce nanostructures with potential to advance energy devices

August 30, 2013 in Battery Energy Storage, Electric Vehicles, EV News

ASU engineering professor and materials scientist Karl Sieradzki has been experimenting for more than two decades with the highly intricate process of dealloying materials. A research paper he recently co-authored with postdoctoral research assistant Qing Chen details how the process can be used to produce nanostructures that could enable advances in battery technology and other energy sources. Photo courtesy of Arizona State University

ASU engineering professor and materials scientist Karl Sieradzki has been experimenting for more than two decades with the highly intricate process of dealloying materials. A research paper he recently co-authored with postdoctoral research assistant Qing Chen details how the process can be used to produce nanostructures that could enable advances in battery technology and other energy sources.
Photo courtesy of Arizona State University

New types of nanostructures have shown promise for applications in electrochemically powered energy devices and systems, including advanced battery technologies.

One process for making these nanostructures is dealloying, in which one or more elemental components of an alloy are selectively leached out of materials.

Arizona State University researchers Karl Sieradzki and Qing Chen have been experimenting with dealloying lithium-tin alloys, and seeing the potential for the nanostructures they are producing to spark advances in lithium-ion batteries, as well as in expanding the range of methods for creating new nanoporous materials using the dealloying process.

Their research results are detailed in a paper they co-authored that was recently published on the website of the prominent science and engineering journal Nature Materials (Advance online publication). Read the article abstract.

Sieradzki is a materials scientist and professor in the School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, one of ASU’s Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering.

Chen earned his doctoral degree in materials science at ASU last spring and is now a postdoctoral research assistant.

Nanoporous materials made by dealloying are comprised of nanometer-scale zigzag holes and metal. These structures have found application in catalysis (used to increase the rate of chemical reactions), as well as actuation (used to mechanically move or control various mechanisms or systems) and supercapacitors (which provide a large amount of high electrical capacity in small devices). They could also improve the performance of electrochemical sensing technology and provide more resilient radiation damage-resistant materials.

The nanostructures that Sieradzki and Chen have produced by dealloying lithium-tin alloys allow for more efficient transport and storage of the electric charge associated with lithium, while the small size prevents fracture of the tin reservoir that serves as a storage medium for lithium.

Lithium-ion batteries are one of the leading types of rechargeable batteries. They are widely used in consumer products, particularly portable electronics, and are being increasingly used in electric vehicles and aerospace technologies.

Sieradzki and Chen say that with more research and development, the porous nanostructures produced by dealloying lithium alloys could provide a lithium-ion battery with improved energy-storage capacity and a faster charge and discharge – enabling it to work more rapidly.

One major advantage is that the porous nanostructures providing this electrochemical power boost can evolve spontaneously during tunable dealloying processing conditions. This, Sieradzki explains, opens up possibilities for developing new nanomaterials that could have a multitude of technological applications.

“There are a lot of metals that scientists and engineers have not been able to make nanoporous,” he says. “But it turns out that with lithium you can lithiate and de-lithiate a lot of materials, and do it easily at room temperature. So this could really broaden the spectrum for what’s possible in making new nanoporous materials by dealloying.”

This article is a repost (press release 8-29-13), credit: Arizona State University, http://www.asu.edu/.